Cruz Admits He’s “In Serious Trouble”

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Cruz

With the evangelical track record of Iowa GOP winner, today’s caucus is a must win for presidential contender Ted Cruz.

Previous Iowa winners squeaked by for the win despite no significant national support. Both Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum took the wins in 2008 and 2012, respectively.

Cruz, who has pandered to the evangelical base, sent an email to a rented list on Saturday, addressing it to his “trusted few.”

In the email that was paid for by the Cruz for President campaign and signed by Ted Cruz himself (assuming he read it), pleaded:

The latest polling shows that Donald’s attacks against me are swaying voters, and unless we can hit this goal and give our volunteers the resources they need — we may not turn out enough voters for the Iowa Caucus.

The candidate went on in his solicitation for funds to say, “I could be in serious trouble.”

The fundraising technique is considered a “wolf at the door letter” by fundraising experts.

A “wolf” letter is a last ditch, desperate effort to raise money – and should only be used once, and only when absolutely necessary as it puts an organization or candidate in a weak position.

While some donors are instigated to give to such a letter, many more are turned off by the appeal as they feel it’s disingenuous, or they believe the letter and consider the candidate toast.

The email, released over the weekend, is similar to the desperate letters sent out to Iowa voters last week.

The letters, inscribed with “Voting Violation” at the top were scare tactics that inappropriately disclosed the voting history and “score” of neighbors while threatening to do the same to the recipient of the letter.

The underhanded letter that bumps at the edge of legality may backfire for Cruz as a higher turnout is unlikely to work in favor of the Canadian-born candidate.

Cruz’s campaign has been notorious for a complete lack of respect for privacy as the data-heavy organization has relied on compiling voter profiles from Facebook profiles to create correlations between online behavior and voting behavior.

Given the “wolf” letter, desperate “voting violation” letter and use of private data, Ted Cruz’s campaign has turned from an anti-establishment movement to a “anything-to-win” campaign of desperation.