Just How Oppressed Is This Victim Of “White Privilege”?

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White Privilege

One of the leaders of the “white privilege” protests that have rocked the University of Missouri isn’t quite as oppressed as he claims.

Turns out that Jonathan Butler, the graduate student who went on a hunger strike to protest Mizzou’s “racist” policies—and inspired Missouri’s football players and coaches to join him—comes from a wealthy family.

A very wealthy family, in fact.

Butler’s father, Eric Butler, is the executive vice president for sales and marketing for the Union Pacific Railroad in Omaha. He made about $8.4 million in total compensation last year—and his total net worth is upwards of $20 million.

Not a bad haul, when all those struggling, debt-ridden middle-class white college students are oppressing you.

Butler had vowed to refuse food until the president of the University of Missouri president, Timothy M. Wolfe, resigned. He got his wish earlier this week—and he has since ended his hunger strike.

Since then, Butler has declined interviews, but said he was “feeling better” now that he has some food in him.

The University of Missouri has been rocked by racially-based protests for nearly a month, ever since black students surrounded Wolfe’s car at the homecoming parade on October 10th.

Wolfe didn’t get out of the car to talk to them, which caused tensions to boil over. It hit fever pitch on Saturday, when black football players refused to play unless Wolfe resigned—which could have cost Mizzou up to $1 million per forfeited game.

Wolfe has since resigned his post, but the protests have continued to rage. Even professors have joined the fray, like Professor Melissa Click, a communications professor who asked for “some muscle” to beat up on a reporter who was taking unflattering pictures of the whining liberal students. She has since apologized, but refused to resign.

Another professor, Dale Brigham, has resigned after he refused to reschedule a test for a minority student who felt “unsafe” coming onto campus, because of white students. Brigham implored her to “not let the bullies win”—but the resulting firestorm was so intense that, like Wolfe, he’s been forced out of Mizzou.

Mizzou isn’t the only school buckling under the weight of race riots and politically correct melodrama. Yale University has also been the scene of protests, after a professor politely suggested a more nuanced debate about what Halloween costumes were appropriate.