Saturday, December 3, 2016

Citizenship

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illegal aliens

The Homeland Security agency responsible for enforcing the nation’s immigration laws is honoring a renowned open-borders activist dedicated to defending illegal aliens in the U.S. with a prestigious award. Known as “Outstanding American by Choice,” it’s bestowed annually by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to recognize the “significant contributions and achievements of a naturalized” American citizen.

This year’s winner is being crowned today at a ceremony in Los Angeles, California where she runs a billion-dollar charity largely dedicated to assisting immigrants.

Her name is Antonia Hernández, a civil rights attorney who spent two decades litigating on behalf of illegal immigrants at the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF), the powerful open borders group that specializes in discrimination lawsuits on behalf of illegal aliens. Promoted as a “Latino advocacy” group, MALDEF also pushes for free college tuition for illegal immigrants and lowering educational standards to accommodate new migrants.

The group’s leadership says it’s racist to make English the country’s official national language and inhumane to protect the southern border with a fence. Hernández was president and general counsel at MALDEF before becoming president and CEO at a like-minded nonprofit with deep pockets called the California Community Foundation.

The charity ranks among the nation’s top100 foundations by size and giving with an endowment exceeding $1 billion. Among its focuses is “immigrant integration.”

Hernández is the oldest of seven children born to poor Mexican immigrants, according to a magazine profile that says before she could drive Hernández walked the picket lines in support of California’s farm workers.

During twenty years at MALDEF Hernández successfully defeated a California measure—passed by voters—that would have denied health and education benefits to illegal immigrants, worked to create voting districts that equitably represented Latinos and litigated on behalf of limited-English proficient students in the nation’s public school system.

A California congresswoman who honored Hernández with a public service award years ago described her as a “tenacious defender of immigration reform” and a “devoted advocate on behalf of fair and just immigration reform.”

Under Hernández’s leadership the California Community Foundation has dedicated large amounts of resources to assist illegal immigrants, especially in the last two years. In 2014, Hernández led an effort to form an emergency relief fund to help the influx of illegal alien minors—mostly from Central America— that the Obama administration allowed to enter the U.S. through Mexico.

The government calls them Unaccompanied Alien Children (UAC) and many have ties to gang members in the U.S., specifically MS-13. In fact, earlier this year Judicial Watch reported that the execution-style murder of a Massachusetts man was committed by two Central American teens that came to the U.S. as UACs under the president’s open border free-for-all. Many of the UACs have also brought in dangerous diseases, including swine flu, dengue fever, Ebola virus and tuberculosis. Nevertheless, Hernández said this about the UACs when her nonprofit scrambled to help them: “They are our children.”

The award that Hernández is accepting today is supposed to go to a candidate that demonstrates “their commitment to this country and to the common civic values that unite us all as Americans,” according to a USCIS announcement. The agency purports to consider candidates’ civic participation, professional achievement and responsible citizenship.

The government’s goal is to recognize individuals who chose to become Americans and have made significant contributions to both their community and the United States. Deputy Security of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas, shamefully ousted as a Clinton federal prosecutor after orchestrating the pardon of a big-time drug dealer, will give Hernández the award at today’s ceremony.

A Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announcement of the event describes Hernández as a civil rights attorney who has demonstrated her commitment of social justice and civic engagement for over four decades.

What are your thoughts on illegal aliens? Should we welcome them or send them home?

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illegal-immigration

The Mexican government has told Texas that they had better start issuing birth certificates to the children of illegal immigrants–or risk lousing up the entire relationship between the U.S. government and Mexico.

Mexico has accused Texas of trying to deny citizenship to the so-called “anchor babies”–children born in America to illegal immigrants, who should automatically receive citizenship at birth because of the Fourteenth Amendment.

In order to obtain a birth certificate in Texas, a parent has to show two forms of identification.

But while illegal immigrants may have a Mexican passport, their other form of government-issued ID is a “matricula,” a special identification card given to illegal immigrants by the Mexican consulate.

But Texas does not recognize matriculas as a valid form of identification. Some Texas country registrars offices are even refusing to accept anything short of a U.S. visa or a U.S. ID card in order to obtain a birth certificate.

Right now, a lawsuit has been filed on behalf of six children by their illegal parents, who came from Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala.

The lawsuit alleges that Texas is violating the Fourteenth Amendment by denying citizenship to children born on U.S. soil.

But Texas claims the ability to choose which IDs to accept is a state issue, and has claimed that not accepting consulated-issued ID cards, like matriculas, is a long-standing policy.

Attorney Jennifer Harbury, who is representing the illegal immigrant families, said that the issue isn’t just whether or not matriculas should be accepted–but whether or not Texas is being fair.

“The argument is ‘what will you take that people can actually get?’” she said. “They have to take something. [The children] were born here. They are U.S. citizens.”

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US History

If you thought mastering basic knowledge of American history, the Founding Documents and our form of government would be a requirement of graduation from high schools across the country, you would be wrong.

This week, Arizona became the first state in the nation to enact a law requiring high school students to pass the U.S. citizenship test on civics before graduation – the same test immigrants must take and pass to attain citizenship.

The measure received bipartisan support and was among the first acts undertaken by the Arizona state legislature and Republican Gov. Doug Ducey who signed it into law yesterday.

Under the new statute, all students must take the test and score at least 60 out of 100, beginning in the 2016-2017 school year – a requirement that the Arizona-based Joe Foss Institute says 15 other states are actively considering this year. The institute’s goal is to have all 50 states adopt the civics education measure by 2017, the 230th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution.

Institute president Frank Riggs said the testing initiative seeks “to ensure the delivery the very basics civics education that every high school graduate should have.” The Arizona law requires students pass the civics test before earning a high school or GED diploma.

Republican Arizona Senate Majority Leader Steve Yarbrough – who fast-tracked the legislation said “requiring that students pass this test is not by any means a silver bullet, but I think is a step, a small step forward”… adding that “we need to encourage the people of America to become more aware of the values of America.”

Here are just a few of the questions that appear on the immigrant test and will appear on Arizona’s civics test (correct answers in bold):

The idea of self-government is in the first three words of the Constitution. What are these words?

  • I have a dream
  • We the People
  • Fourscore and seven years ago
  • Ask not what your country can do for you
  • The only thing we have to fear is fear itself

What do we call the first 10 amendments to the Constitution?

  • The Bill of Rights
  • The 10 Commandments
  • The Law of the Land
  • The Supreme Laws
  • The Executive Laws

How many amendments does the Constitution have?

  • 17
  • 10
  • 27
  • 20
  • 37

How many U.S. senators are there?

  • 200
  • 150
  • 100
  • 50

How long is the term of the president of the United States?

  • 2 years
  • 4 years
  • 6 years
  • 8 years

If both the president and the vice president are incapacitated and can no longer serve, who becomes president of the United States?

  • The Secretary of Homeland Security
  • The Speaker of the House
  • The Secretary of State
  • The Secretary of Defense
  • The Attorney General

How many justices are on the Supreme Court?

  • 5
  • 7
  • 9
  • 11
  • 13

Who wrote the Declaration of Independence?

  • Thomas Jefferson
  • George Washington
  • Benedict Arnold
  • John Hancock
  • Benjamin Franklin

During the Cold War, what was the main concern of the United States?

  • Fascism
  • Communism
  • Commercialism
  • Terrorism
  • Nazism

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