Tuesday, October 25, 2016

North Korea

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north korea

Disastrous flooding has hit North Korea hard and the rouge nation is doing something it never does; they are asking for help.

Flooding in North Korea has killed more than people. The flood has killed the ability to grow food in some areas, killed livestock and hope.

The people of North Korea already live in some of the worst conditions in the world. They fight for survival almost daily and many grow their own food.

The flood not only destroyed the way of live for hundreds of thousands, it also destroyed their only means of survival.

Now the Pyongyang is making a very rare plea for help.

Parts of the country are devastated and normally under any other circumstances; the world would rush to help. Especially the United States and our allies, but this situation is different.

Just last weekend North Korea threatened the United States by testing a nuclear weapon.

Should we help?

At the end of the day, there are hundreds of thousands of people that need help and they won’t see hardly any relief from their own government. Nobody should live in those conditions.

On the other hand, how will we know that the relief money or supplies will actually reach the people?

In the past other relief money was funneled to the North Korean leadership and toward it’s military.

North Korea has aligned itself with China, Russia and Iran, but will those countries help?

Regardless of what the world thinks of America, we are the most giving nation in the world by far. We are always willing to help. If our government doesn’t help, Christian organizations will send help or the Red Cross will step in. Although Obama might not send aid, there are millions of Americans that donate to the Red Cross, and that money is there helping the people in North Korea now.

The people need help in North Korea, but because of their government’s direct and indirect actions, it is not clear if the people will ever get any official help.

Do you think we should help? Let us know in the comments below.

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north korea

North Korea tested a new nuclear weapon last Friday and is daring the west to add sanctions.

The rogue nation of North Korea conducted a nuclear weapon’s test on Friday of it’s most powerful weapon.

Nations around the world, including the United States, condemned North Korea for taking such actions, but clearly they are not worried about any retaliation.

The test took place on Friday and North Korea says that they have figured out how to mount a nuke to a ballistic missile and can now potentially hit the west coast of the United States.

After the test, Obama and other world leaders started talking about sanctions. Obama said that he may be willing to even add new unilateral sanctions.

How did North Korea respond? A state run news channel in North Korea quoted a high-ranking official.

“The group of Obama’s running around and talking about meaningless sanctions until today is highly laughable, when their ‘strategic patience’ policy is completely worn out and they are close to packing up to move out.”

“As we’ve made clear, measures to strengthen the national nuclear power in quality and quantity will continue to protect our dignity and right to live from augmented threats of nuclear war from the United States,”

North Korea is doing their best to arm themselves and seem paranoid that America is going to attack.  They also continue to threaten South Korea, while China works to take over the South China Sea.


Japan Joined in condemning the nuke test and have indicated they support stronger sanctions.

What is next for the isolated country?

North Korea says they are going to continue their efforts in building up their nuclear arsenal, but is Obama going to add new sanctions or it all talk?

Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

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North Korea

This is a case of liberal media running rampant. All over the news yesterday, the headlines read “North Korea Endorses Donald Trump”, but that is only one way to bend reality.

A North Korean wrote an opinion piece that was published in the state run media of North Korea. The legitimacy of the “reporting” is often questioned and rarely honest.

The piece said, “There are many positive aspects to Trump’s ‘inflammatory policies.” They went on to describe Hillary as dull and described the Donald as being a “wise politician.”

They got that dull part right about Hillary, but as far as an endorsement of North Korea for Donald Trump, that is far away.

We didn’t run this story yesterday because it was a non-story in our eyes. Nothing important, but after seeing every major media outlet running the headline “North Korea Endorses Trump”, we had to call them out.

It is amazing how many times the liberal media misquotes Trump to frame him as being racist or anti-woman.

Remember when the left was railing a few months ago when Trump said “women should be punished for having abortions”? Here is what he really said:

After being pushed and pushed by Chris Matthews, Trump said if abortions were banned, then there should be punishment for having one. That is a far cry from how the media framed it.

Donald Trump has said and done many things that have made him one of the most divisive figures in politics in recent history. His speech is crass and he does a good job on his own turning many people off, but the way the media frames it is dangerous.

The media is fueling the fires that are starting to spread in what looks to be a summer of incredible anger, opposition and violence.

Regardless of what you see on the news, Donald Trump is not flying to North Korea with Dennis Rodman and hanging out in Pyongyang with Kim Jong Un.

What do you think about the liberal media? Let us know in the comments below.

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Nuclear Weapons

North Korea makes a huge claim just days after Kim Jung Un orders all his nuclear weapons on the ready.

North Korea is making the news again but this time with a small claim. The young leader, Kim Jung Un announced that his country’s scientists have created a miniaturized nuclear warhead that can fit on a missile.

Kim posed next to a model to show off this great technological triumph, despite majority his people live in extreme poverty.

The feat would be quite impressive if in fact it has been accomplished. There is doubt. South Korea’s Defense Minister almost immediately disputed the claim.

If North Korea has miniaturized a nuclear weapon it would mark a big step in their military capability. A miniaturized warhead could make a missile become a much more powerful weapon.

Nukes detonated in the atmosphere causes and electromagnetic pulse (EMP), which can knock out all electrical circuits in an area. A weapon like that detonated over the west coast of America could be devastating.

Kim Jung Un shows us a great looking model, but we have yet to see any real evidence of the weapon itself.

Despite the lack of evidence of the new bomb, North Korea is becoming fore reckless and again causing problems. South Korea’s Defense Minister spoke about North Korea’s claim and said that action of the North was an “intolerable direct challenge” to the entire global community.

All of this is coming on the heels of Kim Jung Un calling to ready all his nuclear weapons last week in preparation for an attack. The boasting and aggressive behavior is gaining headlines, but any real immediate threat is not apparent.

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Sony hack

“There is no overall Strategy in the departments of IT,” reads one 2012 internal evaluation from within the Information Technology department at Sony Pictures. “Unfortunately my department which is supposed to be in the front line of progress is actually close to obsolete,” reads another. These evaluations, leaked as part of a devastating data breach, paint an ominous picture for the ongoing cyber-attack against Sony that has rocked the entertainment industry; and even has implications for American foreign policy as North Korea appears to be the likely (or at least a likely) perpetrator of the attack.

It might seem odd that a company as large and as cash-rich as Sony would find itself in the middle of a massive data-security breach. However, as leaked internal documents now make clear, the possibility for such an assault was not a matter of “if,” but “when.” These documents paint an unflattering picture of Sony’s corporate IT culture; suggesting that not only were the company’s data security practices woefully deficient for a company of its size and complexity, but its ability to evolve to meet new cyber-security threats was hamstrung by corporate bureaucracy and outright apathy.

Far more important than what price Sony will pay for its cyber- somnambulance are the lessons for the federal government, whose vast data assets are to potential hackers infinitely more enticing and valuable than those of any corporation.

Many of the unflattering descriptions of dysfunction and incompetence within the IT department at Sony could readily be applied to nearly any program of the federal government; but most especially to those related to technology. A prime case in point is the launch of Obamacare. According to Bloomberg news, as of last February the federal government had spent more than $800 million on computer systems to run the online healthcare portal that serves as a gateway to the Obamacare system. In spite of this staggering amount of taxpayer dollars, the system — which did not even make it out of the starting gate without catastrophic system failures — remains to this day, nearly a year later, plagued with fundamental functionality issues and critical data security flaws that have yet to be resolved.

The news in early September that the Healthcare.gov portal had been hacked elicited little surprise, except for the fact that the attack occurred more than one full month before anyone noticed. While no data appears to have been stolen, and the attack appeared to be the beginning stages of a larger attack, it was definitive proof of the nightmare scenario predicted by privacy watchdogs: An arrogant and inept government agency now was in charge of massive quantities of highly sensitive personal information, and it could not even detect an attack on that information in spite of hundreds of millions of dollars spent to do just that.

Sound familiar?

Unlike Sony, in which the fallout from its data breach is limited primarily to its employees and contractors, the federal government holds within its databases personal information on hundreds of millions of individuals touching on virtually every aspect of their lives: criminal, financial, health, travel, and even private communications harvested through the National Security Agency’s data collection programs. Reflecting Uncle Sam’s insatiable appetite for data, these databases are only growing larger and more comprehensive. This makes government targets not only attractive to agenda-driven attackers from countries like North Korea, Russia, China, and others, but also to entities looking to use such information for financial gain.

As we see with Obamacare, the idea that the government can be trusted with protecting information on us that it compiles is not only foolish in theory, but a responsibility it has proven itself incapable of meeting time and again in the real world. Moreover, the refusal to accept this grim reality out of a desire to save face, as Democrats have done regarding Obamacare, only compounds the problems.

Even when the government does get around to discussing cyber-security, its goals usually are more about expanding its own power in domestic surveillance, than it is about data protection for citizens. For example, legislation supposed to protect Internet privacy, such as the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), wound up trampling the very privacy concerns they were supposed to protect.

If we are to take any lesson from the Sony hacking, it is that a culture of incompetence and apathy to data security, such as we so often see in some of the largest federal agencies, creates a target-rich environment for hackers and energizes their endeavors. As government’s demands for data continue to grow both in the scope of data it collects on citizens and in the highly sensitive nature of such information, we should be strongly questioning not only if government is qualified to protect this data from theft, but if it should even be harvesting it in the first place. After all, hackers cannot attack a database that does not exist.

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A video is going viral on YouTube produced by a group, “Taiwanese Animators.”

The video, watched nearly half a million times, is subtitled in English and pans fat Americans being duped by Hollywood. The video poses the question whether this entire fiasco was setup to put money into the pockets of Sony.

Sony Entertainment was hacked by what the FBI has confirmed as a crime originating from North Korea.

Over the weekend, North Korea denied involvement and demanded a joint investigation into the hack. The communist government threatened repercussions if the U.S. refused cooperation.

The video going viral now, is a clear indicator of how the United States is seen by least in Taiwan along with their admiration for the “great leader,” Kim Jung Un.

The United States provides over $2 million in direct economic aid to Taiwan each year. The Taiwanese government, now close with China over shared interests, holds $196 billion of the United State’s growing debt.

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Sony Terror Threat

Sony Pictures is no doubt in turmoil.

On November 24, hackers released a trove of data from the entertainment company including explosive emails, executive salaries and even unreleased copies of Sony movies.

The media has pounced on the leaks, giving them endless coverage of stars, their families, insults and attitudes.

The hacks, conducted by the “Guardians of Peace” have forced the head of Sony Pictures to decry that organizations covering stories derived from the stolen property would face legal action.

To add insult to injury, on Monday, employees of Sony Pictures Entertainment filed a lawsuit against their employer for failing to protect their personal information including Social Security digits and health information.

On Tuesday, this story took a wild twist in which Sony now claims there is a terrorist threat toward any theaters showing their film, The Interview.

While the Department of Homeland Security has deemed the threats to not be credible, Sony has cancelled its December 18th premier and five cinema chains including AMC and Regal have pulled the film.

Terrorism, defined as the use of terror as a means of coercion, has been effective against Hollywood in this case.

Even the stars of The Interview, Seth Rogen and James Franco have cancelled media appearances related to the film which has a storyline of attempting to assassinate the leader of North Korea.

Since Sony’s move toward focusing on terrorism, the headlines of “racist emails” and “Sony greed” have shifted to a whisper.

One has to wonder if this is a crisis management tactic dreamed up by Sony, or are company executives truly willing to cave to empty threats that are likely originating from a powerless, child-like despot in North Korea?



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