Monday, October 24, 2016


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Normally it is NFL players that get in trouble with the law, but a former NBA MVP is now connected to possible rape and a dead officer.

Derrick Rose, point guard for the New York Knicks, is under criminal investigation for a claim of rape.

Nadine Hernandez was one of the two officers working the case and now she has been found dead.

Hernandez was found critically wounded after police responded to reports of a shooting in Whittier California.

The officer was rushed to the hospital where she ended up dying shortly after.

A weapon was recovered from the scene, but since this is an ongoing investigation, there is not a lot of information to report.

The investigation is considering a suicide, but Hernandez was shot at the home of a retired LAPD lieutenant and not her own house.

There is a lot to this story that we don’t know yet, but this case is far from over.

The start of the NBA season is less than two weeks away and one their biggest stars are under rape investigation.

In the NFL, court appearances are common for many of the players. Aaron Hernandez was convicted of murder and we saw Ray Rice beat his fiancé on an elevator in Vegas.

If Derrick Rose is somehow connected to the death of the LAPD officer then that would be tragic for all involved, including the NBA.

Do you watch the NBA? Let us know in the comments below.

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clinton rape

Kathleen Willey, the one-time Democratic activist who claims she was sexually assaulted by Bill Clinton, is taking Hillary Clinton to task over her latest ad.

“She’s a money-hungry hypocritical witch who will do anything for money,” said Willey, about Hillary. “She’s a lying pig. I cannot believe that she had the gall to make that commercial. How dare she? I hope she rots in hell.”

It doesn’t get more blunt than that.

Willey’s words come after Hillary released a new TV ad where she declared that sexual-assault survivors have a “right to be believed.”

It’s kind words to give to a victim of rape and sexual assault–though it’s worth mentioning that no one should have the “right to be believed” as much as they should have the right to seek justice if a crime was, in fact, committed.

But Hillary’s own track record when it comes to her husband’s romantic entanglements show an incredible amount of hypocrisy.

Paula Jones. Juanita Broaddrick. Kathleen Willey. All women who have accused Bill Clinton of sexual assault–and all women that Hillary didn’t think had the “right to be believed.”

In fact, 1990s-era Hillary Clinton was infamous for slandering the women who got too close to her husband–calling Monica Lewinsky a “narcissistic loony toon,” and accusing countless others of lying.

Obviously, no woman should be expected to pal around with her husband’s mistresses–but if Hillary’s going to continue to insert sexual assault victims into the debate, she needs to start with the ones in her husband’s little black book.

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In a bizarre effort to prevent rape on college campuses, the Department of Justice National Institute of Justice awarded almost $600,000 to the University of New Hampshire to create an online video game – aimed at college age men – to teach them about rape and sexual assault prevention.

According to the grant request, the video game, which can also be played on a smartphone, is designed to “deliver a prevention strategy to men in an online application, a format that they use daily, male participants will report increased attention to the message.” Huh?

The university is using the grant to create an Interactive Simulation Video Game “Advisory Board” comprised of “professionals from the behavioral sciences, victim services, prevention, public health, criminal justice, and game design fields.”

The game will be based on the university’s sexual prevention program (sexual prevention?) and bystander marketing campaign (?) to sell posters that depict conversations about rape.

After it is developed, the video game will be tested on 480 students.

How the students will be selected… using what criteria to learn if a “sexual prevention program” (written by whom with what qualifications pursuing what agenda) is effective… with no control group (unless the students are divided equally between those who have committed raped and those who have not) were issues not addressed in the grant request.

“Practicing is the key to prevention,” said Sharyn Potter, the co-director of the University of New Hampshire’s Prevention Innovations sexual violence prevention program who is leading the video game project. We need to go to our target audience and make sure we’re doing this right.”

Target audience? Practice? Practice what?

She added that the game would seek to depict “real life” college parties for students to practice bystander skills.

“We’ve found that if the scenario doesn’t look like a party they would go to on a Saturday night, the intervention is not effective,” Potter said. “It really has to resonate with college students, or there’s no sense in doing this.”

What “intervention” is, how its’ effectiveness can be measured and why the entire exercise is based on the premise that “sexual assault and violence” are routine activities at parties were also questions that went unaddressed. And to muck things up even further:

“The game will be based on the University’s “Bringing in the Bystander” In-Person Prevention Program and the “Know Your Power” Bystander Social Marketing Campaign.”

The marketing campaign features posters of “guy talk,” which tries to depict “real” conversations between students about sexual assault.

“My friend Jeff is the man,” a young man in one poster says. “He got this girl passed out drunk and then nailed her.”

“You’ve got to be kidding. Your friend raped her,” replies another. “Your friend is pathetic.”

In another example, “Guy Talk 2,” the friend Jeff “banged this passed out chick at the party last night.” A good response is “That’s so not cool. What’s wrong with you? Your friend is messed up!”

“Guy Talk 3” appears to imply that a man plans on raping another man he met online. “I met this guy online. He’s coming to my apartment and I’m getting him drunk. We’re hooking up whether he wants to or not.” “That’s not okay,” a friend replies. “That’s rape.”

“Guy Talk 4” shows a group of frat boys planning a party, as one says he won’t drink to “make sure the guys stay in line.” “Good call,” his friend replies. “We don’t want a repeat of the rape that happened last year.”

Other posters depict dorm rape scenes, parties and a lesbian yelling at her girlfriend.



When Comey, the director of the FBI decided not to charge Hillary Clinton, it looks like it had more to do with money than...