Monday, October 24, 2016

University of Tennessee

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University of Tennessee has taken political correctness to a new level–by urging students and professors to give up “offensive” words like “he” and “she.”

Now? You’ll have to call everyone, regardless of gender, the made-up gender-neutral pronoun “ze.”

“With the new semester beginning and an influx of new students on campus, it is important to participate in making our campus welcoming and inclusive for all. One way to do that is to use a student’s chosen name and their correct pronouns,” said Donna Braquet, director of UT’s Pride Center.

“We should not assume someone’s gender by their appearance, nor by what is listed on a roster or in student information systems. Transgender people and people who do not identity within the gender binary may use a different name than their legal name and pronouns of their gender identity, rather than the pronouns of the sex they were assigned at birth.”

The liberal fight for wider recognition of transgender people comes after Caitlyn Jenner, formerly known as the Olympic hero Bruce Jenner, announced “ze” was switching, er, zis gender to female.

It also hit fever pitch after the Supreme Court Obergefell v. Hodges decision, which legalized gay marriage. Gay rights was formerly the Left’s civil rights fight of the moment, but now that that fight has largely been won, it’s moving on to the next class of victims.

The new focus on transgender issues means the Left is now in the tenuous position of fighting for women’s rights on issues like abortion and sexual assault–while also simultaneously asserting that gender is optional and fluid.

It remains to be seen whether or not “ze” will catch on at University of Tennessee–and if other schools will continue to fight to dismantle gender on campus. Or if we’ve already hit peak political correctness–and the backlash that’s fueled Donald Trump’s rise in the polls will ultimately prevail.



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